Antioxidants Lower Female Risk of Diabetes Type II

Recently, a study was published on Diabetologia online, about dietary antioxidant capacity and type 2 diabetes risk in the large prospective E3N-EPIC cohort.

The simple result is that total antioxidants people take from foods or supplements play an important role in reducing risk of type 2 diabetes in mid-aged women.

Below is about the procedure of the study and how the conclusion comes out.

Recent evidence suggests that oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Diets, especially fruits and vegetables, contain a variety of compounds with antioxidant activity that may have cumulative/synergistic antioxidant effects. Total antioxidant capacity is an indicator of dietary intake and is a single assessment of the antioxidant capacity of all dietary antioxidants. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between total antioxidant capacity and the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Of the 64,223 women (mean age, 52±7 years) from the E3N-European European prospective investigational cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort, 1751 women were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes during the 15 years of follow-up. The total antioxidant capacity was estimated using the iron ion reduction antioxidant capacity (FRAP) method. The adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to calculate the associated HR and 95% CI for total antioxidant capacity and type 2 diabetes risk, and corrected for potential confounding factors.

In a multivariate model, higher levels of total antioxidant capacity are associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Compared with women in the lowest quintile, the HR for tertiles, quartiles, and quintiles for overall antioxidant capacity were 0.74 (95% CI 0.63, 0.86), 0.70 (95% CI 0.59, 0.83), and 0.73 (95% CI 0.60, 0.89). The inverse relationship between total antioxidant capacity and risk of type 2 diabetes was linear until it reached 15 mmol/day, after which it reached a plateau.

The results of the study indicate that total antioxidant capacity may play an important role in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes in middle-aged women.

 

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