Any Recommendation on the Poor Circulation Exercise?

You may take a try with the follwoing three one.

Walking
Walking is often very difficult for peripheral artery disease, or PAD, sufferers because it triggers pain, cramping and fatigue in the legs, most frequently the calves. According to the Vascular Disease Foundation, individuals with leg pain caused by PAD are able to walk half the distance of healthy individuals. In fact, many are able to walk only one block at a time due to pain. The reason for this is that exercise increases your body’s need for oxygen. When the leg muscles are starved of oxygen, they become painful or cramped, much like a person having a heart attack experiences chest pain.

Walking is the preferred form of exercise for PAD because it promotes the formation of new blood vessels in the legs, which in turn improves blood flow, leg pain and exercise tolerance. The Cleveland Clinic recommends walking three to five times a week for 30 minutes and then to gradually increase the duration up to 60 minutes. You should continue walking even if you experience leg pain; however it is advisable to stop exercising if the pain becomes severe.

Leg Extensions
Leg extensions target the quadriceps muscles, which are located on the front of your upper leg. For this exercise, you will need ankle weights, which can be purchased at your local sporting goods store. To do this exercise, wrap the weights around your ankles. Sit down on a chair or table. Slowly bring your right foot up until your knee is fully straightened. Pause for a second and then lower your foot back down to the ground. Do three sets of 10 repetitions on each leg.

Hamstring Curls
This exercise focuses on the hamstring muscles, which are found on the back of your upper leg. To start this exercise, wrap the weights around your ankles and stand next to a table or chair for balance. Bend you right knee and slowly bring your heel up towards your buttocks. Pause for a second and then lower your foot back down to the ground. Do three sets of 10 repetitions on each leg.

* The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.