Can High Blood Pressure be Cured Completely?

Diseases in cardiology, we generally do not talk about cure, but say control. The so-called control, plainly speaking, is to prevent or delay the development of the disease.

We can understand the occurrence and development of disease as a line segment, starting point is where the disease begins, the end point can be understood as death. Our control is to control the disease at a point on the line so that it no longer reaches the end point or at least slows it down to the end. High blood pressure is no exception.

In the absence of medical advice without permission to reduce the drug, and take the next day the way of oral administration is completely wrong.

First of all, the control of blood pressure is not a short-term goal, our control of blood pressure is essentially to protect the heart, brain, kidney and other target organs, and to do this, we must adhere to long-term, uninterrupted medication And in the course of medication, blood pressure will also produce fluctuations. But in principle, we generally do not encourage patients to reduce their medication as long as there is no significant drop in blood pressure.

In addition, generally speaking, the antihypertensive effect of hypertension drugs are generally maintained only in 24 hours or so, and the blood pressure effect is proportional to the plasma concentration. That is to say, after the medicine enters the human body for 24 hours or more, it almost loses its function. It is important to know that some drugs may have side effects, but the “side effects” of high blood pressure may be much larger. Only doctors can make scientific trade-offs.

 

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* The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.