Gelatin - What is it & How to use

Gelatin contains collagen, which is one of the materials that make up cartilage and bone. This is why some people think gelatin might help for arthritis and other joint conditions.

Effectiveness

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate.

The effectiveness ratings for GELATIN are as follows:

Insufficient evidence to rate effectiveness for…

  • A kind of arthritis called osteoarthritis. There is some clinical evidence that gelatin might relieve pain and improve joint function in patients with osteoarthritis.
  • Brittle bones (osteoporosis).
  • Strengthening bones and joints.
  • Strengthening fingernails.
  • Improving hair quality.
  • Weight loss.
  • Shortening recovery after exercise and sports-related injury.
  • Other conditions.

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of gelatin for these uses.

Dose

The appropriate dose of gelatin depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for gelatin. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Safety Concerns

Gelatin is LIKELY SAFE for most people in food amounts and POSSIBLY SAFE in the larger amounts used as medicine. There’s some evidence that gelatin in doses up to 10 grams daily can be safely used for up to 6 months.

Gelatin can cause an unpleasant taste, sensation of heaviness in the stomach, bloating, heartburn, and belching. Gelatin can cause allergic reactions in some people.

There is some concern about the safety of gelatin because it comes from animal sources. Some people are worried that unsafe manufacturing practices might lead to contamination of gelatin products with diseased animal tissues including those that might transmit mad cow disease (bovine spongiform encephalopathy). Although this risk seems to be low, many experts advise against using animal-derived supplements like gelatin.

Special precautions & warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of gelatin in medicinal amounts during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Interaction with medication

It is not known if this product interacts with any medicines.

Before taking this product, talk with your health professional if you take any medications.

* The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.