Hepatitis A

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Hepatitis A is a highly contagious liver infection caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). It is one of several various causes of hepatitis, a condition characterized by inflammation and enlargement of the liver. This test detects antibodies in the blood that are produced by the immune system in response to a hepatitis A infection.
The test of hepatitis A would find the antibodies— HAIgM and HAIgG in the serum. And the test results are:

  • If the HAV IgM is not performed, and the HAV IgG or Total Antibody (IgM and IgG) are not Performed, then it indicates acute or recent HAV infection.
  • If the HAV IgM is negative, and the HAV IgG or Total Antibody (IgM and IgG) are positive, then it indicates no active infection but previous HAV exposure; developed immunity to HAV or recently vaccinated for HAV.
  • If the HAV IgM is not performed, and the HAV IgG or Total Antibody (IgM and IgG) are positive, then it indicates that the patient has exposed to HAV but does not rule out acute infection.
  • If the HAV IgM is not performed, and the HAV IgG or Total Antibody (IgM and IgG) are negative, then it indicates no current or previous HAV infection; vaccine may be recommended if at risk.

If the total antibody test or hepatitis A IgG result is positive and someone has never been vaccinated against HAV, then the person has had past exposure to the virus. About 30% of adults over age 40 have antibodies to hepatitis A.

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