Pantothenic Acid - What is it & How to use

Pantothenic acid is important for our bodies to properly use carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids and for healthy skin.

Effectiveness

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate.

The effectiveness ratings for PANTOTHENIC ACID are as follows:

Effective for…

  • Pantothenic acid deficiency. Taking pantothenic acid by mouth prevents and treats pantothenic acid deficiency.

Possibly ineffective for…

  • Skin reactions from radiation therapy. Applying dexpanthenol, a chemical similar to pantothenic acid, to areas of irritated skin does not seem to reduce skin reactions caused by radiation therapy.

Insufficient evidence to rate effectiveness for…

  • Athletic performance. Some research suggests that taking pantothenic acid in combination with pantethine and thiamine does not improve muscular strength or endurance in well-trained athletes.
  • Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). There is conflicting evidence regarding the usefulness of pantothenic acid in combination with large doses of other vitamins for the treatment of ADHD.
  • Constipation. Early research suggests that taking dexpanthenol, a chemical similar to pantothenic acid, by mouth daily or receiving dexpanthenol shots can help treat constipation.
  • Eye trauma. Early research shows that applying drops containing dexpanthenol, a chemical similar to pantothenic acid, reduces eye pain and discomfort after surgery to the retinal. But applying dexpanthenol ointment doesn’t seem to help improve wound healing after surgery to the cornea.
  • Osteoarthritis. Early research suggests that pantothenic acid (given as calcium pantothenate) does not reduce symptoms of osteoarthritis.
  • Recovery of the bowels after surgery. Taking pantothenic acid or dexpanthenol, a chemical similar to pantothenic acid, does not seem to improve bowel function after gallbladder removal.
  • Sore throat after surgery. Taking dexpanthenol, a chemical similar to pantothenic acid, by mouth might reduce sore throat symptoms after surgery.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis. Early research suggests that pantothenic acid (given as calcium pantothenate) does not reduce the symptoms of arthritis in people with rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Nasal dryness. Early research suggests that using a specific spray (Nasicur) that contains dexpanthenol, a chemical similar to pantothenic acid, helps relieve nasal dryness.
  • Sinus infection. Early research suggests that using a nasal spray containing dexpanthenol, a chemical similar to pantothenic acid, after sinus surgery reduces discharge from the nose, but not other symptoms.
  • Skin irritation. Applying dexpanthenol, a chemical similar to pantothenic acid, does not seem to prevent skin irritation caused by a certain chemical in soap. But it might help treat this type of skin irritation.
  • Alcoholism.
  • Allergies.
  • Asthma.
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Colitis.
  • Convulsions.
  • Dandruff.
  • Diabetic problems.
  • Enhancing immune function.
  • Eye infections (conjunctivitis).
  • Hair loss.
  • Headache.
  • Heart problems.
  • Hyperactivity.
  • Inability to sleep (insomnia).
  • Irritability.
  • Kidney disorders.
  • Low blood pressure.
  • Lung disorders.
  • Multiple sclerosis.
  • Muscle cramps.
  • Muscular dystrophy.
  • Other conditions.

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of pantothenic acid for these uses.

Dose

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • As a dietary supplement to prevent deficiency: 5-10 mg of pantothenic acid (vitamin B5).

Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) are based on adequate intakes (AI) for pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) and are as follows: Infants 0-6 months, 1.7 mg; infants 7-12 months, 1.8 mg; children 1-3 years, 2 mg; children 4-8 years, 3 mg; children 9-13 years, 4 mg; men and women 14 years and older, 5 mg; pregnant women, 6 mg; and breastfeeding women, 7 mg.

Safety Concerns

Pantothenic acid is LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth in appropriate amounts. The recommended amount for adults is 5 mg per day. Even larger amounts (up to 10 grams) seem to be safe for some people. But taking larger amounts increases the chance of having side effects such as diarrhea.

Dexpanthenol, a derivative of pantothenic acid, is POSSIBLY SAFE when applied to the skin, used as a nasal spray, or injected as a shot into the muscle appropriately, short-term.

Special precautions & warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Pantothenic acid is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in recommended amounts of 6 mg per day during pregnancy and 7 mg per day during breast-feeding. However, it is not known if taking more than this amount is safe. Avoid using larger amounts of pantothenic acid.

Children:Dexpanthenol, a derivative of pantothenic acid, is POSSIBLY SAFE for children when applied to the skin.

Hemophila: Do not take dexpanthenol, a derivative of pantothenic acid, if you have hemophila. It might increase the risk of bleeding.

Stomach blockage: Do not receive injections of dexpanthenol, a derivative of pantothenic acid, if you have a gastrointestinal blockage.

Ulcerative colitis: Use enemas containing dexpanthenol, a derivative of pantothenic acid, cautiously if you have ulcerative colitis.

Interaction with medication

It is not known if this product interacts with any medicines.

Before taking this product, talk with your health professional if you take any medications.

* The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.