Phosphorous Test - Normal, High, Low

Phosphorus tests are most often ordered along with other tests, such as those for calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and/or vitamin D, to help diagnose and/or monitor treatment of various conditions that cause calcium and phosphorus imbalances.

There are mainly two ways to test the phosphate in the body.

  •  blood test (most common)
  •  urine test (monitor its elimination by the kidneys)

The normal range of the phosphate level varies among people:

  • Adults: 2.8 to 4.5 mg/dL
  • Children: 4.0 to 7.0 mg/dL

Low levels of phosphorus (hypophosphatemia) in the blood may be due to or associated with:

  • Increased blood calcium (hypercalcemia), especially  hyperparathyroidism
  • Overuse of diuretics
  • Malnutrition
  • Alcoholism
  • Severe burns
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis (after treatment)
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Decreased blood potassium (hypokalemia)
  • Chronic antacid use
  • Rickets and osteomalacia (vitamin D deficiencies)

Higher than normal levels of phosphorus (hyperphosphatemia) in the blood may be due to or associated with:

  • Kidney failure
  • Liver disease
  • Hypoparathyroidism
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis (when first seen)
  • Increased dietary intake (phosphate supplementation)
* The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.