Triglycerides-Reference Levels

Triglycerides are a type of fat (lipid) found in the blood. A triglycerides test is to assess your risk of developing heart disease and to monitor the effectiveness of lipid-lowering therapy.

The reference levels of triglycerides are as follows:

Adults:

  • Normal level — Less than 150 mg/dL (1.7 mmol/L)
  • Borderline high level— 150 to 199 mg/dL (1.7-2.2 mmol/L)
  • High level— 200 to 499 mg/dL (2.3-5.6 mmol/L)
  • Very high level— Greater than 500 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L)

Children, teens and young adults:

From newborn to age 9

  • Normal level —Less than 75 mg/dL (0.85 mmol/L)
  • Borderline high level—75-99 mg/dL (0.85-1.12 mmol/L)
  • High level—Greater than 100 mg/dL (1.13 mmol/L)

For ages 10-19 years

  • Normal level —Less than 90 mg/dL (1.02 mmol/L)
  • Borderline high level—90-129 mg/dL (1.02-1.46 mmol/L)
  • High level—Greater than 130 mg/dL (1.47 mmol/L)

For young adults older than 19

  • Normal level —Less than 115 mg/dL (1.30 mmol/L)
  • Borderline high level—115-149 mg/dL (1.30-1.68 mmol/L)
  • High level—Greater than 150 mg/dL (1.7 mmol/L)

High levels of triglycerides may indicate:

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Coronary artery disease
  • Stroke
  • Pancreatitis
  • Kidney disease
  • Cirrhosis of the liver or other liver diseases
  • Diabetes

Keywords: TG; Triglycerides; TRIG

* The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.