Turmeric: Uses & Side Effects

Uses

Turmeric is used for arthritis, heartburn (dyspepsia), joint pain, stomach pain, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, bypass surgery, hemorrhage, diarrhea, intestinal gas, stomach bloating, loss of appetite, jaundice, liver problems, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, stomach ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), gallbladder disorders, high cholesterol, a skin condition called lichen planus, skin inflammation from radiation treatment, and fatigue.

It is also used for headaches, bronchitis, colds, lung infections, hay fever, fibromyalgia, leprosy, fever, menstrual problems, itchy skin, recovery after surgery, and cancers. Other uses include depression, Alzheimer’s disease, swelling in the middle layer of the eye (anterior uveitis), diabetes, water retention, worms, an autoimmune disease called systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), tuberculosis, urinary bladder inflammation, and kidney problems.

Some people apply turmeric to the skin for pain, ringworm, sprains and swellings, bruising, leech bites, eye infections, acne, inflammatory skin conditions and skin sores, soreness inside of the mouth, infected wounds, and gum disease.

Turmeric is also used as an enema for people with inflammatory bowel disease.

How should I take turmeric?

When considering the use of herbal supplements, seek the advice of your doctor. You may also consider consulting a practitioner who is trained in the use of herbal/health supplements.

If you choose to use turmeric, use it as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider. Do not use more of this product than is recommended on the label.

Turmeric is thought to be possibly safe when used short time as a mouth rinse or as an enema.

Do not use different forms of turmeric (pills, liquids, and others) at the same time or you could have an overdose.

If you need surgery, dental work, or a medical procedure, stop taking turmeric at least 2 weeks ahead of time.

Call your doctor if the condition you are treating with turmeric does not improve, or if it gets worse while using this product.

Store as directed, or at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Precautions

Ask a doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider if it is safe for you to use this product if you have ever had: diabetes; gallbladder problems; an iron deficiency; bleeding problems or a blood-clotting disorder; a stomach disorder called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); endometriosis or uterine fibroids; cancer of the breast, uterus, ovary (or other hormone-sensitive conditions).

Turmeric when taken in medicinal amounts is considered likely unsafe to use during pregnancy. Taking turmeric during pregnancy could cause uterine bleeding or contractions.

Ask a doctor before using this product if you are breast-feeding.

Turmeric taken by mouth may lower testosterone levels and sperm motility in men. This could affect fertility (your ability to have children).

Do not give any herbal/health supplement to a child without medical advice.

Interactions

Turmeric can make it harder for your body to absorb iron. Tell your doctor if you are taking an iron supplement.

Avoid using turmeric together with other herbal/health supplements that can also affect blood-clotting. This includes angelica (dong quai), capsicum, clove, dandelion, danshen, evening primrose, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, horse chestnut, Panax ginseng, poplar, red clover, saw palmetto, and willow.

Avoid using turmeric together with other herbal/health supplements that can lower blood sugar, such as alpha-lipoic acid, chromium, damiana, devil’s claw, fenugreek, garlic, guar gum, horse chestnut, Panax ginseng, psyllium, Siberian ginseng, and others.

Keyword: Turmeric.

* The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.