What Do You Know about Lattice Degeneration?

Q:
What do you know about lattice degeneration?

A:
Lattice degeneration is a retina condition in which the retinal tissue is abnormally thin and the blood vessels have a “lattice-like” appearance due to fibrosis.

Lattice degeneration lesions, usually localized, appear as round/oval or linear patches in the far peripheral retina.

It does not typically cause symptoms, but if symptoms occur, they include photopsia, or flashing lights in the patient’s peripheral (side) vision.

Diagnosis of lattice degeneration is done by a well-dilated, peripheral retina examination called ophthalmoscopy.

Treatment of lattice is typically prophylactic.

In rare cases, the doctor performs a “barrier” laser to “tack down” the retina surrounding these lesions to avoid the possibility of retinal detachment. If the doctor finds a retinal tear near the lesion, a preventative laser procedure can help avoid retinal detachment complications.

 

Keywords: lattice degeneration; lattice degeneration overview.

 

* The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.